Due to the lack of information that is currenly taking place in the State of California, we are bringing you this information before it is no longer available to you. Most links will NOT work from this page. Go to the source as below if needed.

NOTE: Reference URL Promed Web Page


ISID Home
about ISID | membership | programs | publications | resources | 11th ICID | site map
 
ProMed Home
 
  Navigation
Home
Search Archives
Announcements
Recalls/Alerts
Calendar of Events
Maps of Outbreaks
Submit Info
Subscribe/Unsubscribe
FAQs
About ProMED-mail
Who's Who
Awards
Citing ProMED-mail
Links
  
Archive Number 20021006.5482
Published Date 06-OCT-2002
Subject PRO/AH/EDR> Newcastle disease, game birds - USA (TX): warning

NEWCASTLE DISEASE, GAME BIRDS - USA (TEXAS): WARNING
****************************************************
A ProMED-mail post
<http://www.promedmail.org/>
ProMED-mail, a program of the
International Society for Infectious Diseases
<http://www.isid.org/>

Date: 4 Oct 2002
From: Carla Everett <ceverett@tahc.state.tx.us>
Subject: NEWS RELEASE, Texas Animal Health Commission, Austin


Texas poultry and game bird owners urged to check flocks
----------------------------------
Texas animal health officials are urging poultry, fowl, and game bird 
owners to check their flocks and report signs of illness among birds after 
exotic Newcastle disease (END), a highly contagious virus among birds, was 
confirmed on 1 Oct near Los Angeles, California. While END poses no threat 
to human health, some strains of the virus can kill nearly 100 per cent of 
affected birds.

"California's disease investigation was initiated in late September after 
nearly 200 game birds died on a premise near Los Angeles," said Dr Max 
Coats, assistant deputy director for Animal Health Programs at the Texas 
Animal Health Commission (TAHC), the state's livestock health regulatory 
agency. "The National Veterinary Services Laboratory (NVSL) in Ames, Iowa, 
has completed tests on samples collected from the birds and confirmed the 
Exotic Newcastle Disease (END) diagnosis. As of 3 October, 6 California 
premises are involved in the poultry disease situation, and infected flocks 
are being depopulated to prevent spread of END. Fortunately, none of the 
affected premises are near commercial poultry operations, and regulatory 
veterinarians from California and the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) 
say there is no indication of additional infected farms."

Dr Coats pointed out that a wide variety of pet and wild birds can carry 
END. He urged flock owners to check birds and report signs of illness to 
the TAHC at 1-800-550-8242. TAHC or USDA veterinarians can work with 
private practitioners at no charge to collect samples for testing.

Signs to watch for include:
- birds that gasp and cough
- birds that exhibit central nervous system disorders, such as circling, 
depression, paralysis, drooping wings, or dragging legs
- birds that produce fewer eggs
- birds with greenish diarrhea
- birds that develop swelling of tissues around the eyes and neck
- unusually high death losses in the flock

Dr Coats said laboratory testing is needed to confirm a clinical diagnosis 
of the Newcastle Disease, as signs can also mimic those of other poultry 
diseases. In Texas, tests can be run by staff in the poultry diagnostic 
laboratories in Center and Gonzales. These are part of the Texas Veterinary 
Medical Diagnostic Laboratory system, headquartered in College Station.

Carrier birds can spread the virus through respiratory discharges or feces. 
Caretakers can also become mechanical carriers of the disease, as the virus 
can be picked up and carried on shoes and clothing, feed trucks, or 
equipment. In warm, humid weather, the virus can survive several weeks; in 
cold temperatures, it can remain alive indefinitely. Viral disinfectants, 
dry weather and sunlight kill the virus. "This is a good time to step up 
biosecurity practices on farms and ranches. Routine measures should include 
disinfecting footwear prior to entering or leaving a poultry facility, 
wearing disposable coveralls, or at least putting on clean clothes prior to 
entering a poultry site," said Dicky Richardson, a TAHC animal health 
programs specialist who works with poultry disease.

"We require our staff also to wear disposable hair covers and gloves as 
added protection against disease transmission. Producers should consider 
disinfecting tires on vehicles, bagging dirty clothing prior to leaving a 
premise, and monitoring visitors, including feed providers, service 
personnel and poultry buyers to ensure they are following disinfecting 
procedures. Anyone in contact with backyard poultry or game bird flocks 
should shower and change their clothes before coming into contact with 
commercial poultry."

Richardson said producers who visit a feed store, a neighbor's farm, coffee 
shop, or grocery store should change their clothes and disinfect footwear 
before returning to their poultry houses. "It's just too easy to get 
clothing or footwear contaminated with a disease-causing virus and then 
carry it home," he said.

"If END is introduced into an area, it is critically important to address 
the outbreak immediately with depopulation of infected flocks, strict 
quarantines in affected areas and surveillance in neighboring areas," said 
Dr Coats. He said an outbreak in southern California in 1971 resulted in 
the depopulation of nearly 12 million birds on 1341 farms. That outbreak, 
which cost taxpayers $56 million, took 3 years to eradicate, and disrupted 
poultry production and trade, and impacted prices of poultry products. "By 
reporting signs of disease immediately, the effects of outbreaks can be 
minimized," said Dr Coats. "We depend on the partnership of producers, 
veterinary practitioners, the Texas Veterinary Medical Diagnostic 
Laboratory, and the public to keep livestock and poultry free of disease 
and to maintain our trading opportunities."

-
Carla Everett
<ceverett@tahc.state.tx.us>

[Clearly the outbreak in California is serious and it is likely other 
states will take the same stance of warning to their producers as Texas 
has. Education regarding clinical signs and the seriousness of the 
situation are certainly appropriate. With increased awareness, it is hoped 
the disease can be contained more quickly.

According to the USDA: "Exotic Newcastle disease is a contagious and fatal 
viral disease affecting all species of birds. Previously known as velogenic 
viscerotropic Newcastle disease (VVND), exotic Newcastle is probably one of 
the most infectious diseases of poultry in the world. Exotic Newcastle is 
so virulent that many birds die without showing any clinical signs. A death 
rate of almost 100 per cent can occur in unvaccinated poultry flocks. 
Exotic Newcastle can infect and cause death even in vaccinated poultry.

An outbreak of exotic Newcastle today would affect the US poultry industry 
severely. In 1971, a major outbreak occurred in commercial poultry flocks 
in southern California. The disease threatened not only the California 
poultry industry but the entire US poultry and egg supply. In all, 1341 
infected flocks were identified, and almost 12 million birds were 
destroyed. Eradication efforts cost taxpayers $56 million, severely 
disrupted the operations of many producers, and increased the prices of 
poultry and poultry products to consumers. Exotic Newcastle has not 
infected commercial chicken flocks in the United States since that outbreak 
was eradicated in 1974." (From the website: 
<http://www.aphis.usda.gov/oa/pubs/fsend.html)>.

Newcastle disease virus can produce a transitory conjunctivitis in man, but 
the condition has been limited primarily to laboratory workers and 
vaccination teams exposed to large quantities of virus and before 
vaccination was widely given to crews eviscerating poultry in processing 
plants. The diseases has not ben reported in people who care for poultry or 
consume poultry products. - Mod.TG]

[see also:
Newcastle disease, game birds - USA (CA): OIE          20021004.5468
1999
---
Newcastle dis., imported wild birds - USA (Calif.)(02) 19991021.1881
Newcastle disease, imported wild birds - USA (Calif.)  19991016.1842
1998
---
Newcastle disease, game birds - USA (California)(05)   19981014.2033
Newcastle disease, game birds - USA (California)       19980615.1132]

...................tg/sh

*##########################################################*
ProMED-mail makes every effort to  verify  the reports  that
are  posted,  but  the  accuracy  and  completeness  of  the
information,   and  of  any  statements  or  opinions  based
thereon, are not guaranteed. The reader assumes all risks in
using information posted or archived by  ProMED-mail.   ISID
and  its  associated  service  providers  shall not be  held
responsible for errors or omissions or  held liable for  any
damages incurred as a result of use or reliance upon  posted
or archived material.
************************************************************
Visit ProMED-mail's web site at <http://www.promedmail.org/>.
Send  all  items  for   posting  to:   promed@promedmail.org
(NOT to  an  individual moderator).  If you do not give your
full name and  affiliation, it  may  not  be  posted.   Send
commands  to  subscribe/unsubscribe,   get  archives,  help,
etc. to: majordomo@promedmail.org.    For assistance  from a
human  being  send  mail  to:   owner-promed@promedmail.org.
############################################################
############################################################

about ISID | membership | programs | publications | resources
11th ICID | site map | ISID home

2001 International Society for Infectious Diseases
All Rights Reserved.
Read our privacy guidelines.
Use of this web site and related services is governed by the Terms of Service.